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A home away from home - Working Abroad

2015-11-23 09:00:00 +0000 by Anneloes Geerdink

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If you came to me 2 years ago and asked me about my plans for the future – I certainly would not have said that I would be living and working in Dublin, Ireland. Did I want to leave the Netherlands?

Well I was wasn’t dying to leave – I loved my home city, Amsterdam was my home with my friends and family all around me. So you are probably thinking, what changed & why did I suddenly up sticks and go to work abroad?

Well just over a year ago my boyfriend was offered an amazing Dutch Speaking job opportunity to work in Dublin. Did I want to leave the Netherlands? – Not really, we both had good jobs, a lovely apartment and were comfy in our own environment. Why would I want to upset all that?

After long discussions we eventually said that there was no harm in working abroad for a while and going to Ireland and my boyfriend at least sitting the interview. The worst that could happen is that he didn’t get the job but we would have had a mini holiday in Dublin. The entire time I was in Dublin, I kept asking myself if I could really live and work in Dublin – would I fit in? Would I feel at home? After asking myself over 100 questions (which felt like an intense interview – let me tell you) we decided to go for it, we left the Netherlands & moved to Dublin.

I hear a lot that nothing good happens in your comfort zone and believe it or not all those people are right. You will see what I mean when you make the move to live and work abroad – to live in a new city is full of excitement and is actually quite fun. You will find that you will want to explore your new home more and more – so you treat yourself more by eating breakfast in one of many Café’s, go for lunch and dinner & just suddenly find your favourite places to wine and dine. But what you don’t realise when you are exploring is that you have been socialising and learning, listening to locals, taking in the new culture & making a friend here and there – whether it be at work or in the local café where you bump into the same lady every morning that you both now sit for a quick chat.

What about my friends back home?

They may not be here but never forgotten; they are just a phone/skype call away or even a 1 hour planer ride. My weekends most recently have been filled with friends coming to Dublin and me showing off my favourite hotspots and listening to the ‘’ooohs’’ and ‘’ahhs’’ of my secretly jealous Dutch speaking friends.  But just because I am in Ireland, does not mean that I am the only Dutch speaker – I have found many other Dutch speakers and because there may not be as many of us over here, we all welcome each other with open arms – It’s all so lovely. In Dublin, I have made friends for life and would never change my decision to move to work abroad – I love my life here.

What about a career?

Of course you need a job to survive and I have to say that Dutch speaking jobs are everywhere, with more and more companies going global, more and more Dutch speakers are needed. When I arrived in Dublin I found a job almost straight away and it was a great switch from what I worked in, in the Netherlands (Youth & childcare) to now where I am a Dutch speaking multilingual talent recruiter in an international company.

In the last year I have opened many doors, to adventure, to new beginnings, to new jobs and so much more, I would be lying if I said that I didn’t miss the Netherlands but believe me, nothing has changed, whenever you go home and you are with your friends and family, everything is the exact same. 

If you would like some advice about working abroad or some help in find a Dutch Speaking Job Abroad - Please do not hesitate to get in touch with me. I would be deighted to help you get on your wat. 

Call +353 15 24 24 20

Email: anneloes@careertrotter.eu

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