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Dutch Speakers Living & Working in Ireland: Our Research

2016-06-07 09:00:00 +0100 by Kellie-Anne Molloy

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In January of 2016, Careertrotter embarked upon an important mission - to gain a better understanding of the main motivating factors that bring Dutch speakers to live and work in Ireland. Careertrotter successfully completed an online survey thanks to all you lovely Dutch speakers out there. The survey itself contained 25 questions overall - where we looked into the general back grounds and motivators for Dutch speakers to live and work in Ireland, along with their job search habits when it came to looking for Dutch jobs

First off - we know no one wants to sit and read a 10-page document so what we have done is created a neat infographic so you can get all the information you need in bite size pieces. Of course we do need to give you a quick sum up before we go into everything - so bear with us. 

Our Results: 

96% of the respondents were native Dutch, leaving the remaining 4% near native. The majority of respondents were aged between 18-40 and nearing 90% have a 3rd level degree under their belts. Out of all respondents 94% have already made the move to live and work in Ireland and for the remaining that haven't, they are simply waiting on the right Dutch Speaking job opportunity to persuade them or they are in the middle of their studies. Those that are already here in Ireland (51%) are living in Dublin and over 25% plan on moving to Dublin from their current location in Ireland. 

One point that we find important to stress is the fact that over 72% of the respondents did not know that Ireland was as absolute career hub for international talent, even though 57% stated that Ireland was their first choice they still had no idea how in demand their Dutch language skills where. On a brighter note, it was great to see that those who have come to Ireland, have been here between 2-5 years (17%) and 10+ years (28%). Nearly 35% plan on staying in Ireland forever and 75% said that they would do it all over if they had their time again - which is great to hear, especially if you are the one looking for Dutch speakers to join the team. 

From our research we can see that over 90% of the respondents are already here in Ireland and others are currently thinking about it. Leading one to believe that the talent is certainly out there - they are just looking for the right chance. Those that came to live and work in Ireland, did so between the ages of 18-30 - when surveyed we found that the majority of respondents are now significantly older (31-40), indicating that those who have made the move have stayed, Ireland is indeed an attractive country for a career move, all that is needed is the right publicity. 

What we found interesting was that 74% were totally unaware that Ireland was an international hub in search of bilingual speakers. This truly stresses the fact that if Ireland really wants to be seen as a multilingual hub, it needs to portray itself more a multilingual centre within the EU in order to attract international talent for its ever growing clientele. 

Our research tells us that 51% of the respondents are currently living in Dublin, and another 24% plan on moving there very soon. Few now live outside of the capital, which we feel is down to poor publicity of the multicultural nature of other cities in Ireland. 

Dublin is still the best chance for multilingual speakers to find a job with their language – they are exposed to a bigger pool of potential employers. While other cities like Cork and Galway are on the rise, they still have some way to go in comparison to Dublin. 
This could be a contributing factor as to why companies may be finding it difficult to attract international talent to offices outside of the capital.

Ireland certainly has potential in attracting Dutch speakers, however, more work is needed to reach those who are currently abroad. 

Stay tuned for our German speakers in Ireland report and if you would be interested in researching other language speakers and their motivations for living and working abroad in a certain country - feel free to get in touch with herbert@careertrotter.eu for more. 


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