Connecting to LinkedIn...

W1siziisijiwmtqvmdkvmjyvmtivmduvntavodk3l2jhbm5lcl8xlmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwimtkymhg5ntajil1d

Blog

How to Read a Job Spec before sending in your application for a Multilingual Job Abroad

2016-11-28 06:00:00 +0000 by Kellie-Anne Molloy

W1siziisijiwmtyvmtevmjivmtuvmzmvmtyvotexl2dpcmwtmta2ndy1of85njbfnziwlmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwinjawedqwmfx1mdazzsjdxq

When it comes to working abroad and applying for multilingual jobs – it can be as simple as a few clicks and done. But have you ever thought of the damage you could be doing to your online job applications?

Recruiters like ourselves here at Careertrotter can come up against the same CV more than once but if we see that you have applied for several jobs that in no way suit the requirements, we would be forgiven for ignoring your application – No-one wants time wasters!

To help you with your online multilingual job applications and to get the best out of them we have our very own quick guide on how to read a job spec and what to take from the text in front of you.

OUR TOP TIPS:

  • Read the Entire Job Spec

This may seem quite obvious but you would be surprised by how many multilingual jobseekers we have come up against who read a few lines and completely missed the country that the laanguage job was in. So, Read the job spec from top to bottom.

  • Highlight as you go:

As you give the Job Spec a full read – Pick out specific keywords and highlight them – i.e. the industry the multilingual job is in, the location, the salary and interview process – This is how you can start to break down what the company/recruiter is looking for and where.

  • Do you meet the hard requirements?

Once you have read the job spec fully and have a general understanding – Go back to the requirements and see if you actually have what the recruiter/company is looking for. If the job calls for 3 years’ experience – make sure you have 3, same goes for education requirements – if you see the need for someone with a 3rd level degree – it’s in there for a reason.

If you don’t meet the hard requirements – best practise is to avoid clicking apply – you are wasting your time and the recruiters.

  • Is working abroad for me? Would I be happy there?

As we deal with helping multilingual speakers live & work abroad – It’s important to note where the job is based. You need to ask yourself some hard questions and do some research, such as checking up on the average salary in that country, the cost of living, culture, food etc. Check up on all things that would impact your daily life – because if you can’t picture yourself working there it won’t be a happy experience.

Some of our multilingual jobseekers apply because they love the sound of the job and didn’t really do their own research on the country where they would be living and working. By the time we got in touch with them and explained what life would be like there, they had changed their mind and wasted both theirs and our time.

  • Questions & Answers

You may have noticed the odd question thrown into several multilingual job specs. Employers like to do this for a very specific reason (we do too) – that is because they would like to see if you have actually read the job spec. If you see any opportunities for you – the jobseeker – to answer any questions, make sure you have those answers ready in your first screening call with a company/recruiter. Doing so shows you are well prepared and that you have read the job spec fully.

  • Read the entire job spec again.

Yes, its annoying – but you never know you could have missed some vital information – you really want to know the job inside out before you click ‘’Apply’’. Doing so makes everything so much easier for everyone involved – We cannot stress it enough – read, read and re-read the entire job spec.

There you have our top 6 tips on how to read a job spec and get the best out of your job search for an exciting opportunity abroad. For more great tips – Click to Careertrotter today – Helping you find Multilingual Jobs Abroad is our speciality. 

comments powered by Disqus